Healing, caring and dying with music

 

 

“As well as making us feel good all over, music can reduce pain and increase the appetite in dementia.”

- James Carleton ABC Radio National 'God Forbid'


Music and Healing Kirsty Beilharz in interview with James Carleton (Sunday 23 April 2017 6:10AM)
Listen to whole episode Music and healing, Muslims in the media (Sunday 23 April 2017)

 

 

 

Boxwoodin palliative care

 

Music can carry associated feelings of:

• belonging
• reassurance
• acceptance
• hope
• forgiveness
• acquiescence
• compassion
• peace
• resolution in relationships
• purpose, meaning and context in the vast cosmos and plane of time.

 

 

 

 

 

 


“Music is a birthright of humanity.”

— Laurie Riley, Body, Mind and Music. (Denver, CO, USA: Harps Nouveau, 2010), 4. 

 


Orchid Orchid3

 


Needs often treated by music therapists in end-of-life care include:

• the social (e.g. isolation, loneliness, boredom)

• emotional (e.g. depression, anxiety, anger, fear, frustration)

• cognitive (e.g. neurological impairments, disorientation, confusion)

• physical (e.g. pain, shortness of breath)

• spiritual (e.g. lack of spiritual connection, need for spiritually-based rituals).

 

— Amy Clements-Cortes, ‘The use of music in facilitating emotional expression in the terminally ill,’ American Journal of Hospice and Palliative Medicine, Vol. 21, No. 4 (July-August 2004): 255-60.
— J. Cunliffe, ‘Reflections on pain management: a case study,’ International Journal of Palliative Nursing, (October 9 2003): 449-53.
— C. C. O'Callaghan, ‘Communicating with brain-impaired palliative care patients through music therapy,’ Journal of Palliative Care Vol. 9, No. 4 (Winter 1993): 53-55.
— Deborah Salmon, ‘Music and emotion in palliative care: Accessing inner resources’ in (ed.) C. A. Lee, Lonely Waters. (Oxford UK: Sobell Publications, 1995): 71–85.

 

 

 

Harp

 

 

[Music assists with] "anxiety, stress, pain management, grief and also provide beauty, peace and comfort."
— Alison Ware
 therapeutic harpist
— 'The emerging field of harp therapyand its clinical applications' 
Journal of the Australasian Rehabilitation Nurses' Association 
(JARNA), 2013; 16(2): 15-17.

 

 

"The spiritual dimension focuses on meaning of life, hope and purpose, explored through relationships with others, with the natural world and with the transcendent."
— Harriet Mowat and Maureen O’Neill, Insights: Spirituality and Ageing – Implications for the care and support of older people, Vol. 19 (Institute for Research and Innovation in Social Services, January, 2013), http://www.iriss.org.uk.

 

 


Seaside

 

Shakuhachis2

 

 

For people with dementia

 

Dementia may affect:

People living with dementia may experience Hyperacusis "reduced tolerance to specific sounds and sound levels that are not normally regarded as loud" — specific frequencies (pitches and sound qualities).

Music evokes increased arousal/awakening:


"A condition of heightened alertness, awareness, interest, and excitement; 
a generally enhanced state of being"
— Anthony Storr Music and the Mind

 

 

 

Joy


Potential benefits of music for people with dementia:

"… In particular, the response to music is preserved, even when dementia is very advanced"
— Oliver Sacks Musicophilia (2007)

 

 

Friends

 


"The beauty of music has the ability to speak where words fail"

— Robert Gupta (TED Talk)

 

 

Listening

 

 


… "Evidence suggests that ‘genuine and intentional accompaniment of people on their ageing journey; giving time, presence and listening are the core of good spiritual practice."
— Harriet Mowat and Maureen O’Neill, Insights: Spirituality and Ageing – Implications for the care and support of older people, Vol. 19 (Institute for Research and Innovation in Social Services, January, 2013), http://www.iriss.org.uk.

 

 

Schopenhauer, Kant, Hegel, Nietzsche, Freud and Jung, said the metaphysical quality of music permeating inner life (inhabiting spiritual vitality) creates meaning and passion
Nietzsche went so far as to say that music made life worth living.

 

 

"To express yourself as you are is the most important thing"
— Shunryu Suzuki
, Buddhist monk, author

 

 

“Quality of care is the degree to which acceptable standards are met or exceeded in relation to physical, personal, psychological, spiritual and socio-cultural care and support”
— Australian Aged Care Quality Agency

 


“Quality of life … refers to the experience of well-being and overall enjoyment of … lifestyle.”
— Department of Health and Ageing, Australian Government Canberra

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Accordion

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


“Music enhances the brain’s ability to learn.”
— Laurie Riley, Body, Mind and Music. (Denver, CO, USA: Harps Nouveau, 2010), 5, referring to Don Campbell, The Mozart Effect.

 

 

Beethoven said music was the mediator between the spiritual and the sensual:

"one incorporeal entrance into the higher world of knowledge which comprehends mankind but which mankind cannot comprehend".

 

 

— Tess Howgate, Eternity News

 

 

 

Sunset

 

 


“It has become appallingly obvious that our technology has exceeded our humanity.”

 — Albert Einstein

 

 

Waves

 

 

Rose